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The Bishop’s Indulgence

Ah, you have to admire the inventiveness of the Roman Catholic Church. First they scare the crap out of their faithful following by letting it be known that they will be punished for their sins in purgatory before they can enter Heaven but then they offer a ‘get-out clause” of sorts by offering the opportunity to buy/earn an indulgence which will either reduce their time in purgatory or even erases their punishment entirely …. sweet deal, don’t you think? In Medieval Europe one could buy the Bishop’s Indulgence although some of the movers and shakers of the day objected to this (big shout out to Martin Luther) and eventually the Church outlawed the sale of indulgences in 1567.  We here at Oliver’s Brewery would like to offer our own Indulgence for sale. I’m pretty sure that it won’t absolve you of any of your sins, in fact it may lead to a few new ones but I think everyone should get to indulge themselves of the pleasure of this new stout. We’re brewing it today. I can’t tell you too much about it as we’re driving blind on this one, never having brewed it before, other than it’s going to be big and bold (hopefully close to 8% abv) and we’re using a lot of roasted caramelized cocoa nibs and vanilla beans in it. Chocolate is the word of the day down here! As with our other big beers we had to remove the sparge arm from the mash tun to fit all of the mash in it!

Mashing-in The Bishop's Indulgence

Mashing-in The Bishop's Indulgence

Mashing-in

Mashing-in

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  1. Steve says -

    I LOVE chocolate beer. I just hope you know more about making beer than you do about history or theology.

    The Church has ALWAYS outlawed the attempt to sell grace as the sin of simony. The sale of indulgences was condemned by numerous councils and synods, including the Council of Florence over 100 years before Martin Lucifer Luther.

    But enough theology. Bring out the beer!

  2. Steve says -

    I believe that it is historical fact that indulgences were being sold and, under mounting criticism the Church took action to prevent this in 1567.